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Sea Grant Extension


Sea Grant provides a workforce of over 500 on‐the‐ground extension agents who reside in many of the communities they serve. As trusted experts who are considered honest brokers of information (non-advocacy), extension agents provide reliable technical and science‐based information to residents to address local needs while also transferring research priorities back to their universities.

Extension agents also work closely with Sea Grant communicators and educators, connecting university resources and expertise with local communities and user groups. An agent might develop new information through original applied research, gather existing information for user needs, transmit information and skills through pamphlets, courses, workshops, lectures and meetings; provide technical reviews of research and policies; and stimulate new research to meet perceived needs. In short, these specialists take complex information and show people how to use it to solve problems. Extension agents are focused on specific topics such as improving fisheries management, seafood safety, fishing gear enhancement, developing sustainable aquaculture, decreasing water pollution, restoring habitat and other topics that advance the safety and productivity of coastal‐related commerce.

 

595

EXTENSION

PROFESSIONALS

270369

VOLUNTEER 

HOURS

270

COMMUNITIES 

IMPROVE 

HAZARD RESILIENCE

260959

INDIVIDUALS REACHED

THROUGH 

WORKSHOPS

Metrics reported July 2019 for work completed February 1, 2018 to January 31, 2019.


Featured Extension Efforts



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Sea Grant Extension in the News


Sea Grant awards $16 million to advance U.S. aquaculture

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Sea Grant awards $16 million to advance U.S. aquaculture

New research and innovative collaborative efforts aim to advance domestic aquaculture. Forty two new projects funded by Sea Grant in three programs will work to increase understanding and transfer knowledge to end users for different topics and geographies across the U.S.

Sea Grant awards $2 million to advance understanding of American lobster, support industry

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Sea Grant awards $2 million to advance understanding of American lobster, support industry

Sea Grant is funding new research aimed at understanding physical and chemical changes affecting American lobster (Homarus americanus) in the Gulf of Maine as well as a regional lobster extension program. 

Sea Grant Celebrates National Fishing and Boating Week

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Sea Grant Celebrates National Fishing and Boating Week

The sun is shining and the water is calm: what better way to spend a warm summer day than dropping anchor, kicking back and casting a line? Every year, tens of millions of people flock to U.S. coasts to enjoy recreational fishing and boating. Sea Grant supports the recreational fishing and boating enthusiasts and industries by providing resources that teach people learn how to fish and boat, help boaters and anglers determine when and where to go on the water, how to get the most out of their excursions while staying safe, and how to protect the environment so future generations can enjoy the same experiences.

How does shellfish aquaculture interact with Puget Sound's marine life?

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How does shellfish aquaculture interact with Puget Sound's marine life?

In Puget Sound, The Nature Conservancy in Washington wants to learn more about shellfish aquaculture structures and how they impact the marine environment for specific organisms or life stages. They partner with the National Oceanographic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and Washington Sea Grant, as well as the Jamestown S’Klallam Tribe and shellfish farms, to study which fish and crab species use shellfish aquaculture habitats.

In Puerto Rico, investing in lifeguards keeps beaches safe and sustains coastal tourism

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In Puerto Rico, investing in lifeguards keeps beaches safe and sustains coastal tourism

Since the 1960s, surfers from the United States have been going to Rincón, Puerto Rico to catch the best waves of the winter season. The trend has been so consistent that the town has slowly built its economy along its approximate eight miles of beautiful coastline, now famous with tourists. Yet, as the surfing community continues to swell, the beaches get crowded, and the same waves that keep the local economy afloat also put tourists and locals at risk of losing their lives.

Science Serving America's Coasts

National Sea Grant College Program
1315 East-West Highway | Silver Spring, MD 20910 | 301.734.1066
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